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Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder

Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder

This week, we’re proud to feature Natalie Uy of Obsessive Cooking Disorder in the Blogger Spotlight. For those new to the column, every Friday, we highlight a member of The Daily Meal’s Culinary Content Network, a limited group of bloggers who write about food and drink.

We look to this group of talented food writers for inspiration and participation in The Daily Meal, whether for restaurant recommendations or new recipes to try out for dinner. Our editorial team covers All Things Food and Drink, and we tap the CCN to keep up to speed on what is happening around the country and the world — from fine dining to home cooking.

Natalie Uy is a medical school student based in Houston, Texas who enjoys cooking, baking, and eating when she is not studying to become a doctor. She created her blog Obsessive Cooking Disorder (fondly known as OCD) as a way to keep her recipes in one place, and then started to develop a passion for food photography.

The Daily Meal: What is the mission of your blog?
Natalie Uy: As Remy from Pixar's Ratatouille stated, “If you are what you eat, then I only want to eat the good stuff!” Anyone can learn to make delicious food — you just have to start somewhere! I want to encourage people yes, you can cook and eat decently healthy food on a busy schedule, no matter the skill level. Also, I just want to get people excited about food through my photos, cooking tips, and nerdy food history/science facts.

How’d you get started with your blog?
I started OCD simply as a way to keep track of my recipes. I could never remember which recipes — notably carrot cake and banana bread — I had tried before, or what modifications I had made. The posts began as just the recipes with my notes and later on, I started adding photographs. I chose the name Obsessive Cooking Disorder from my mild OCD about cooking and as a play on medical terminology. I chose the name Obsessive Cooking Disorder from my mild OCD about cooking and as a play on medical terminology.

What are some foods you can’t live without?
I'm a dessert girl. Dark chocolate (nothing less than 72%!), berries, and Greek yogurt/ice cream — that’s my late night snack every day, and I never get tired of it.

What are some foods you can’t stand?
Too much fast food or fried food because all of that grease just settles in my stomach. These are fast food chains in every teaching hospital I've rotated at, and my goal is if to get through all four years without eating any of it once (even if it's 4am in the morning on night call).

What is your proudest blog post?
My most life defining ones are my Crostini and Braided Nutella Bread // I said yes because the crostini post went up when I decided to go into Internal Medicine, and the Nutella bread went up when I got engaged!

What is your biggest blog blunder?
While I've been fortunate not to have any blunders on this yet, one of the challenges about blogging medical stories is respecting patient and physician privacy. While all the stories are true, I'm always careful to change names and identifying information.

What is your most memorable comment from a reader?
I LOVE all comments, but the ones from doctors and fellow students (also food bloggers) who encourage me during tough times — long ER shifts, overnight calls, taking boards — really keep me going. One wrote, “You are one crazy amazing lady cooking, blogging, and being a doctor.” I suppose I am, but I wouldn't give either up for anything

What’s on your cooking playlist?
This sounds ridiculously nerdy, but I listen to pathology audiotapes. I can knead my sourdough bread for 30 minutes and simultaneously learn about lung cancer. Win!

What are your favorite food blogs?
I love iamafoodblog, My Name is Yeh, and Lady and Pups for their uniqueness. You really get to see their distinct personalities and styles.

Favorite food apps?
None, unless you count Pinterest and Instagram. Nearly all of my apps are medical-related.

What is the best thing about blogging?
Hearing people from all over the world and in real life tell me about how much they loved reading my stories, seeing my artwork, and, of course, testing out my recipes. The internet is amazing!

Worst thing about blogging?
My cooking schedule because what and when I cook revolves around whether there's good natural sunlight. It pains my fiancé when I make a delicious dessert, then tell him he can't touch it until the next day because it needs to be photographed first.

What would even your most loyal followers be surprised to learn about you?
People often think I feast like a king and eat beautiful food every day. If my recipe isn't for a blog post or for company, I put zero effort into plating or even what I eat, like week old pizza. As long as it tastes good, it works for me! I'm not a foodie, just a simple, hungry med student who likes to eat (a lot).

Six of your all-time favorite posts:

  • Peach Raspberry Sunrise Smoothie
  • Serendipity's Frozen Hot Chocolate
  • Corn Bread Dog Mini Muffins
  • Local Food's Roast Beef Sandwich and Kale Side Salad
  • La Madeleine Fruit Tart // Almond Tart Crust
  • Made with Consternation (Chocolate Macarons)

Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Blogger Spotlight: Obsessive Cooking Disorder - Recipes

Have you ever been stranded at the airport? Well, long story short, my brother en route to Argentina for his college business program got stranded at the (furthest possible) airport last month. I received this phone call at 12 am, amidst torrential rains and flash flood warnings, right as I'm about to go to bed.

Hans: Hey, uh, Achie (big sister) my friend and I are stranded at the airport, and there's no hotel vouchers. so you have the great joy of staying up late and driving to get us. Thanks.

Since I was not prepared for guests, I literally had no food. My +6 ft teenage brother was rather dismayed when he opened the fridge at 2 am, starving.

Hans: Oh my God, I knew it! This is EXACTLY what I expected in Achie's fridge. There's no real food - just some rotting bananas, fat free Greek yogurt, and, ugh, vegetables!

Filipino Turon (Fried Banana Lumpia)

Ingredients
spring roll wrappers
2-3 ripe plantains or cooking bananas (saba)
strips of jackfruit (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar
Cooking oil, for frying

Directions
Separate the spring roll wrappers, and cut the bananas lengthwise into 2-3 inch pieces. Lay the wrapper on a plate, dip the banana (and jackfruit) in sugar and layer along diagonally. Fold starting at the end of the wrapper with the filling, fold the 2 sides in, then roll up to the end. Seal the end with water.

Heat up the oil in medium heat and fry the turon with the sealed end side down first (to keep it sealed). Cook until golden brown, then flip to fry the other side, and once slightly browned, sprinkle sugar onto the oil to caramelize. Serve warm and eat fresh.

Another option is to bake them in the oven at 375F until golden brown, about 20-30 min. Serve fresh (baked turon seems to lose crispiness faster). I've tried both ways, and I have to say I prefer the fried version, but both are delicious!

Turon rolling tips: Cut the bananas/plantains lengthwise for easier rolling. The size of saba (small plantains) are nicely suited for small spring roll wrappers. Also don't be afraid of adding sugar, as plantains are NOT nearly as sweet as bananas (make sure they are almost black for full ripeness).

PS. Don't eat plantains raw no matter how good they seem. They taste terrible unless cooked.


Watch the video: The Familiar Kitchen: a second-generation food blog by Ann Ittoop (January 2022).