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Microbrewers Canning Craft Beer for Quality

Microbrewers Canning Craft Beer for Quality

As craft beer grows each year, new breweries emerge, beer evolves, and new trends emerge. Canning is one of those trends and presents many benefits to both brewer and customer. By: Michelle Klug

Thinking of beer in a can may leave a bad taste in your mouth. You may associate it with cheap, metallic-tasting beer or rowdy tailgating, but the recent evolution of canned beer may challenge those preconceived notions. A growing number of craft brewers and beer experts will be quick to tell you that putting high-quality product in cans is key for convenience and quality.

“Cans are superior for packaging because of the portability and the quality of the beer,” Dale Katechis explained. Katechis is the owner of Oskar Blues Brewery; he started the trend of canning craft beer in 2002. Since craft beer has taken off, and steadily rises each year, canning can be something that defines a brewery. For beer lovers, there’s no mistaking the bright blue and red Oskar Blues Dale’s Pale Ale can. Everything from hoppy pale ales, smooth stouts, and wheaty summer beers are now being canned.

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Factually, canning beer maintains the quality of the product better than bottles.

“In general, people consider draft beer to be the freshest, best beer you can get, so we like to think of the can as a mini-keg that delivers draft-quality fresh beer to your glass,” Clayton Robinson, owner of Sun King Brewing Company, said.

Julia Herz, craft beer program director at the Brewer’s Association, said craft beer in a can maintains its quality since it is not spoiled by light. “With cans, sunlight cannot permeate the beer. With clear and green bottles, light causes a photochemical reaction where beer can start to give off a skunk aroma,” Herz said. “With brown bottles, there is less light getting in, but still some.”

Canning brewers will tell you that this is not just their own personal opinion, but a matter of beer science. “Light causes beer to have a skunk-like flavor because it degrades the hops and actually creates the same chemical compound that a skunk excretes - hence 'skunky',” Clayton Robinson said. Cans also protect from oxygen, another component that can cause beer to go bad.

A popular complaint is the metallic taste associated with cans; Katechis refutes that myth by pointing out, “There’s a liner in aluminum cans that protects the beer from ever touching metal.” Katechis added that the tinny taste comes from the low-quality beer that was in cans before craft beer took over this improved packaging process.

Quality is not the only benefit of canning. Beer in a can is much more portable and eco-friendly. While taking a bunch of clanking bottles to outdoor activities can be a pain and maybe even illegal, cans are lighter, more easily transported, and allowed in some stadiums and parks. “The portability of cans is unmatched,” Colorado-based Katechis added. “You can cool down a can of beer in 5 minutes, take them backpacking, hiking, on bike trips – basically anywhere in the outdoors.”

Cans are also better for the environment: “Cans are infinitely recyclable and take far less energy to do so than their glass counterparts,” Robinson said. Recycling facilities are more likely to take aluminum as well.

Beyond convenience and quality, this unique packaging process has actually been shown to save breweries money. “Cans are definitely less expensive to transport because they are lighter,” Herz said. Simply put, less weight means less fuel and brewers can recirculate this extra cash back into their breweries.

When it comes to cans, brewers are fully aware of the stigmas that come along with canned beer – besides metallic taste; canned beer is associated with cheap beer.

“We started canning in 2002. It was hysterical at the time to even consider putting craft beer in a can because of the reputation,” founding canner Katechis said. “We felt like consumers would scoff at it, but we decided to take the risk.”

Since 2002, many breweries have followed suit. Herz said she has seen a steady growth since Oskar Blues emerged with their compact cans. Canned craft beer expert Russ Phillips said there are over 200 craft breweries brewing over 600 varieties of canned craft beers – a dramatic rise from just one in 2002.

“Sierra Nevada in now canning,” Herz said. “They started the style of American Pale Ale, so the fact that they are now canning is huge.”

Craft beer sales continue to rise each year, with a 15% increase in 2011, according to the Brewer’s Association. When it comes to canning, both brewers and experts are confident that quality will take precedence over can stigmas for true beer lovers.

“We still have a long way to go but early adopters were willing to try it and realized that there’s too many advantages to let the myths about cans outweigh the benefits,” Katechis said.

“I think it will only advance more quickly from here,” Herz added. “Selection and diversity are beautiful things for craft beer lovers; style, brand, and packaging all represent the evolution of craft beer.”

If the curiosity for cans strikes you, Oskar Blues cans are available in most convenience stores. Try a Mama’s Little Yella Pils for a light, citrusy beer, suitable for a sunny, hot day outside. For a more robust find, grab a classic hoppy Dale’s Pale ale, or for a warm pick-me-up on a cool night, try a smooth Old Chub Scotch Ale.


How far have we come with craft beer?

This year’s American Craft Beer Week is great time to take the time to reflect on how different the landscape of what American beer has become. Somewhere in the past few years, the large independent, regional and local brewers have become THE folks to rally behind. They now represent the American Dream and the spirit of fierce independence. The industry seems to be liked by all, held in esteem, and respected as a sustainable business model. We, as craft beer drinkers, are not seen as drunkards, but connoisseurs! The brewers’ entrepreneurial journeys have infected our hearts, minds and tongues. The products have flavor, uniqueness and depth. The availability of well made beers and styles are almost endless.


Spindrift Brewing Co. – Making waves in the microbrewery world

“Do you want to try some?” Usually when I conduct interviews for the magazine, it’s me asking the questions, but this was definitely an occasion where I was hoping to be asked that one question in particular. The man asking was Andy Armstrong, co-owner and managing partner of Spindrift Brewery in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. He was offering me samples of Spindrift Brewery’s four micro brewed lagers and after a tour of the 3,400 square feet state of the art production space where Brewmaster Kellye Robertson puts them all together, I was thirsty.

When Armstrong walked behind the bar to pour me the first 5oz sample – the German-style Festbier they call Coastal Lager – I was immediately reminded of my grandfather. He was a school teacher and lobster fisherman in Cape Breton who painted his buoys the blue, red, and white of the Montreal Canadiens. When storms snapped his lines and his buoys crashed to shore, local beachcombers always knew who they belonged to and that my grandfather would pay a modest sum for their return. He’d repaint them, measure new lines, tie them to a new trap and toss them back to the mercy of the waves off Port Morien until they were unable to fulfill their duty any longer. Sitting on its side on the bar with 24oz Tallboy cans of each of Spindrift Brewery’s four lagers perched atop – labels faced-out – was a blue, white, and red striped wooden lobster buoy that reminded me of my childhood in Canada’s Ocean Playground. It was slightly weathered with a new line attached as if it were recovered the morning after a nor’easter. It was a connection that made the flavours I was about to experience that much more full.

“This is an Oktoberfest-style beer. So it is caramel in colour, has a lot of malt-forwardness to it and a nice bitter, hoppy finish to it. It’s quite nice.” As I watched him pull back the first of four custom beer tap handles that resembled in shape and colour the different buoys profiled on each can, I was reminded of our conversation earlier in his office.

“Spindrift occurs when a wave crashes. Just imagine a wave crashing. You see a mist come off the back of that wave – that is spindrift. It’s fresh. It’s bold. It happens at an exciting time when the wave finally crashes,” Armstrong said from behind his desk.”It also happens in the winter, with snow drifts. The blowing snow that comes off the top of snow drifts is spindrift again. It’s very much Maritime imagery and that’s what we were going for.”

After I sampled what I can only describe as a delicious tease of sweet malt, spicy rye, and orange flavours, he began to pour me another 5oz mug from the contents of the next tap, Riptide IPL – a northeast-style hoppy lager with subtle tangerine and pine aromas. He told me, “This is Nova Scotia’s first India Pale Lager – we’ve made a lager-version of an IPA. It’s delicious. It’s a northeast-style, Maine- style IPL and nobody’s done it before.” It was delicious.

After Armstrong told me he’d pass along my compliments to chef, as it were, I took this moment to ask him why each can profiled a buoy rather than spindrift itself. He explained that”When we tried to graphically depict spindrift it was impossible. You can’t do it justice. So Andrew Bell, my business partner, said, “Spindrift is a great name, there’s more than one story behind it, but what is more Maritime and nautical than lobster buoys? Every lobster buoy is individual they have their own markings so that fisherman knows it’s theirs. So we’ve adopted that. Each buoy in the corporate logo represents the colours of each of the Maritime flags.Each of the Spindrift brews has a buoy with it’s own identity. This buoy is present on the cans and casts down to a replica buoy tap handle for the bars and restaurants. Coastal Lager is Blue and White to pay homage to Nova Scotia colour’s. Rip Tide is yellow with a red angled slash, as evidence when a rip tide occurs a red and yellow flag is placed on the beach. Knotty Buoy is a Bavarian Pilsner and thus it’s buoy boast the colours of the Bavarian Flag. The newest entry to the line up, Abyss, a German Style Shwarzbier (black lager) boasts a cream colour buoy with a large black dot, symbolizing the tantalizing dark liquid that is Abyss.

As he grabbed a fresh sample mug and moved back to the tap, this time reaching for the yellow and azure buoy tap handle to the Bavarian-style Pils they call Knotty Buoy, I had to ask Armstrong a follow-up question that had formed in my mind earlier:

“When did it all come together?” I asked him after I finished 5ozs of Knotty Buoy, which did live up to its description as a refreshingly crisp beer with a dry finish.

“We brewed our first beer in August, 2015 but broke ground that February.”

But it wasn’t his first foray into the beverage industry, I learned.

“I own another company called Atlantic Spirits and Wines and it represents different alcohol beverages from around the world.So, I’ve been involved in the beverage and alcohol game for close to 25 years now. I’ve worked directly for Molson and Seagrum.”

I was eager to have a sneak-peak sample of Spindrift Brewery’s newest beer, Abyss – a traditional German-style black lager that features a combination of malt proole and German Hersbrucker and Magnum hops – but I was curious what motivated Armstrong to take on Goliath.

“The next big thing is small batch brewing and we discovered an opportunity in the craft beer segment. Craft beer has always been something I wanted to do – myself and Andrew. He has family lineage that goes back generations to brewers in Newfoundland. Although there are several microbreweries in Nova Scotia, still only five percent of business done at the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission is craft beer. When you look at developed markets south of the border and elsewhere in Canada, it should be a minimum of 10%. So, you will see, more than likely, the craft beer industry in this province double over the next half-decade – and then get even bigger. With the amount of microbrewers, craft beer will rise to 15% in the foreseeable future. This is why we’ve committed to brick and mortar,” he said as he handed me a cool 5ozs of dark, crisp, Made in Nova Scotia lager.

Abyss did have, as described at spindriftbrewing.com, notes of toasted grains, coffee and chocolate malts – not to mention an elegantly smooth finish. It was just as Armstrong told me earlier, “a sessionable beer.”

It’s not a stretch to say that the initialism IPA is known around the globe. India Pale Ales are as ubiquitous as their ingredients. I confessed to Armstrong – who didn’t, by the way, have a bar towel over his shoulder – that I’d never heard of an IPL before. He assured me that’s common.

“We’re a lager-focused brewery. Chances are most microbrewers people come across are ale-focused. We decided there’s tons of ales flooding the market place. Everyday there’s a new one. But you don’t come across a lot of microbreweries doing lagers, or at least focusing on them. We make four beers, soon five, and they’re all lagers. And the difference in that is this: an ale can be made anywhere between five and fifteen days from the time it’s brewed to the time it’s packaged to the time it’s available for consumption. Lagers need 35 days, minimum, from the time it’s brewed until we put it into a package of some kind. Lagers ferment at much lower temperatures than ales do. The lager fermentation process is anywhere between seven and 15 days, depending on the alcohol content you want and how many times the yeast has been pitched – and then it has to lager for three weeks after that. So you get a much more refined product with a lot of natural carbonation. Less filtration is involved and shelf life is greatly extended as a result of lagering process.When you’re brewing in much smaller sizes, the malt and the yeast is exposed to so much more, so you’re getting much more flavourful beer than you can get out of the big commercial systems. The other big thing is that there are no additives or preservatives. It’s four simple ingredients.”

When I enquired as to how long it took Armstrong to familiarize himself with the vernacular of brewing, his answer was anything but self-promoting. “Beer’s always been the same. Beer needs fermentation, it needs laydown time. Andrew and I aren’t Brewmasters, so we went out and found a very, very capable young woman by the name of Kellye Robertson.”

Kellye is a graduate of Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia who then went on to the Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management program at Niagara College, Ontario, a two-year concentrated studies program focused on brewing beer.

“She came up with the recipes. What we did [Andrew and I] was go out and identify the holes. We asked ?What are the styles that aren’t out there that might entice the consumer?’ This particular line of beers is very consumable, it’s darker in colour, has got lots of flavour to it, it’s a very nice product.”

He continued: “The brewery is the most technologically advanced of its size anywhere east of Ontario. We’ve invested. It’s fully computerized, well with the exception of the malt room, and once the malt is put into the bin she [Kellye] wants with the various styles of malt. Literally one person can brew she can brew beer by herself.”

The bells and whistles are every bit impressive as Armstrong boasted at the bar.

The entire brewery operates on steam heat. Nowhere is there an open flame used in the brewing process, which eliminates hotspots in beer kettles and in turn the scorching of malts. This leaves the by-products of Kellye’s job ripe for the feeding. “A dairy farmer comes and picks them up, free of charge,” Armstrong said. “It’s high quality feed for his cows.”

The canning line is very efficient – well, a better word might be ?cool’ – and it’s worth a look.

“On our Facebook page there is in fact a video of the process, as well as on our webpage.”

If you’re in the neighbourhood of Frazee Drive in the Burnside Industrial Park in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, the retail store where I sat and sampled beer as Armstrong’s guest is definitely worth a look. “We do tours for the public, host tours and samplings for bachelor and bachelorette parties, do our kegging and deliveries out of here, and we sell our product. The Growlers are extremely popular – we sell a ton of them.”

Spindrift Beer is also available in Nova Scotia Liquor Commission stores and locations throughout the Atlantic Canadian provinces.


From garage brewer to beer god

The story behind Brooklyn Brewery’s growth is fascinating, and is a definite source of inspiration for any aspiring entrepreneur or craft beer buff.

Born out New York’s home brewing scene in the 1980’s, the company began as a neighborly project between Associated Press correspondent Steve Hindy and Tom Potter in their Park Slope apartment. Hindy had been introduced to home brewing through Western diplomats stationed in the Middle East. Desperate for a cold beer and unable to find any locally, they resorted to brewing their own. Hindy brought the knowledge back with him when he returned to Brooklyn. The equipment Hindy and other home brewers used can easily be purchased online. Prices range from $40 to $335 for more advanced kits.

Since then, Brooklyn Brewery has experienced tremendous growth , much of which can be attributed to the growth and fascination with independent culture. In 1996 it opened up the doors to its facilities in Williamsburg, Brooklyn at a time when the area was little more than a sketchy industrial zone in the shadows of Manthattan. Then properties in area were valued at $10 to $20 per square foot. However the seeds of gentrification had been planted, as many artists were increasingly calling Williamsburg home in an effort to recreate the feel of “Paris during the 50’s.”

Today Brooklyn Brewery’s facilities, made up of three buildings on three blocks of prime hipster real estate, neighbor VICE Magazine headquarters, Brooklyn Bowl, high end luxury apartments and some of the most popular nightlife destinations in New York City. The buildings which include 21,000 square foot brewing space, 4,000 square foot event space and ab 35,000 square foot warehouse have a current market value of $896 per square foot. An increase of over 4000% since 1996. A residence the size of the facilities would cost an estimated $53.46 million in today’s market.

More valuable than its land (at least to us) is the beer Brooklyn Brewery produces. In 2012 it bottled, barreled and canned over 5.4 million gallons of beer helping to generate $40 million in revenue. Ottaway estimates the brewery will bring 6.5 million gallons to market by the end of 2013.

So how do you become the next Brooklyn Brewery, Samuel Adams, Red Hook Brewing or the thousands of other breweries concocting some delicious bread water? Simple, just buy yourself a brewing kit, find a recipe you like and start brewing.


CERVEZA QUIJOTA

Today we were welcomed by Juan Ezequiel Campos González to his Microbrewery, located in a 400m2 unit at the industrial business park of Campollano. in Albacete, Spain.

Juan is owner, manager, operator and brewer at Quijota, producer of craft beers following a traditional method using natural ingredients and applying basic mechanization. Juan tells us that the objective is to offer craft beers of maximum quality ‘without filtering or pasteurizing, generating carbonic gas and alcoholic fermentation with the yeast in a second fermentation in a bottle, and without adding any artificial preservatives’.

For the production of QUIJOTA craft beer, a BREWGOLD 500 V2.0 equipment is used that allows the production of 500 litre batches.

In the brewery there are also two 2 thermally controlled rooms. In the 35Im2 ‘Fermentation Room’ primary fermentation occurs in 4 stainless steel fermenters, each with the capacity to hold the 500 litre production batch, and then, secondary fermentation can be carried out in a bottle. In this room a constant temperature between 18 and 21ºC is maintained. Bottling is also carried out here. Juan tells us that current production capacity is of 3000 litres monthly, limited by the fermentation capacity. This could be doubled to 6000 litres per month by the installation of 2 more fermenters.
In a second ‘Ripening Room’, a 25m2 space where temperature is maintained at 6ºC the bottled beer is ripened for a minimum of 2 weeks.

I asked Juan about his inspiration for the brewery.
‘It began as a as simple curiosity about the world of craft beer, leading to a business project. Finally, the interest became a possible professional project and a reality after winning the first prize in the I FORUM ALBACETE CAPITAL of ENTREPRENEURS 2012. Counting on the collaboration of Brewer Master Jose Luis (“Azor Manchego”) the project of Quijota craft beer was officially launched in April 2014.’ Juan has an obvious love of the brewing industry, learning his craft through informal learning, extensive reading on the topic, research of brewing methodologies, ingredients and of course exhaustive trial and error as a home brewer.
Any why the name ‘Quijota’?
‘Given our geographical location in Castilla la Manchan we looked for a name that would immediately identify us with the region so we came up with Quijota, a tribute to the most illustrious figure in of our history ‘Don Quijote’ (Quixote) , using its name in feminine because beer is feminine.

Juan continued ‘The main idea was to have 3 standard elaborations of well-differentiated styles, soft one, stronger one and black one. Our Brewer Master, great connoisseur and lover of German beers, provided us with these recipes:
QUIJOTA RUBIA (KÖLSCH style) 4.8% vol. Alk., EBC 12, IBUS 25
QUIJOTA MORENA (ALTBIER) 5.4% vol. Alc., EBC 41, IBUS 37 (1st ACCE Contest Award 2010)
QUIJOTA NEGRA (STOUT) 5.0% vol. Alc, EBC 84, IBUs 40 (2nd ACCE Contest Award 2012)
We also came up with an idea to prepare special elaborations, although they require more efforts in elaboration, design of labels etc., and these elaborations are very rewarding.’
On the other hand, elaboration of personalized recipes is an important part of the production process. Presently we are preparing 3 orders for customers who shall use our beer with their own mark and 2 more projects are in testing phase.
So, where can we find Quijota Beer?
‘At the beginning, the idea was to focus on local and provincial market. After few months, we faced an increasing necessity to expand, and we starting to look for new outlets at national level. Currently we almost 400 points of sale at National level, mainly achieved through the channels of HORECA and establishments of selected products. We have signed a contract with two major distributors to commercialize our beers nationwide. We also work with about 10 websites that sell craft beers online.
In May 2016 we obtained the international kosher certificate, without geographical limitation, being the first Spanish brewery (industrial or craft beer brewery) to obtain it. The kosher symbol on the label represents much more than a product, conforming to religious norms and standards. With a control and care that is involved, it guarantees the highest levels of quality for a great diversity of customers, and of course, it allows us to be included in the kosher gourmet section of El Corte Ingles super markets, at national level.
And the future for Quijota?
We are taking new contacts to start exporting, although it’s a slow process. Our aim is to start exporting to Eastern Europe and also Argentina and other South American countries.
Our biggest challenge is to keep making better beers, to grow and create jobs. The main idea or point of self-employment project is to be able to live thanks to this project and at the same time, have fun working on the beer elaborations.

And so, finally we get to taste the fruits of Juan’s labour. I chose QUIJOTA RUBIA (KÖLSCH style) 4.8 ABV. This light and refreshing Blonde style beer is a fusion of two cultures, mast Mancha and German noble hops. With a golden colour it pours with a medium lasting white head. It tastes with a slight bitterness, malty but with fruity flavour. Salud!
Find out more about Quijota at http://www.cervezasquijota.es


CERVEZA QUIJOTA

Today we were welcomed by Juan Ezequiel Campos González to his Microbrewery, located in a 400m2 unit at the industrial business park of Campollano. in Albacete, Spain.

Juan is owner, manager, operator and brewer at Quijota, producer of craft beers following a traditional method using natural ingredients and applying basic mechanization. Juan tells us that the objective is to offer craft beers of maximum quality ‘without filtering or pasteurizing, generating carbonic gas and alcoholic fermentation with the yeast in a second fermentation in a bottle, and without adding any artificial preservatives’.

For the production of QUIJOTA craft beer, a BREWGOLD 500 V2.0 equipment is used that allows the production of 500 litre batches.

In the brewery there are also two 2 thermally controlled rooms. In the 35Im2 ‘Fermentation Room’ primary fermentation occurs in 4 stainless steel fermenters, each with the capacity to hold the 500 litre production batch, and then, secondary fermentation can be carried out in a bottle. In this room a constant temperature between 18 and 21ºC is maintained. Bottling is also carried out here. Juan tells us that current production capacity is of 3000 litres monthly, limited by the fermentation capacity. This could be doubled to 6000 litres per month by the installation of 2 more fermenters.
In a second ‘Ripening Room’, a 25m2 space where temperature is maintained at 6ºC the bottled beer is ripened for a minimum of 2 weeks.

I asked Juan about his inspiration for the brewery.
‘It began as a as simple curiosity about the world of craft beer, leading to a business project. Finally, the interest became a possible professional project and a reality after winning the first prize in the I FORUM ALBACETE CAPITAL of ENTREPRENEURS 2012. Counting on the collaboration of Brewer Master Jose Luis (“Azor Manchego”) the project of Quijota craft beer was officially launched in April 2014.’ Juan has an obvious love of the brewing industry, learning his craft through informal learning, extensive reading on the topic, research of brewing methodologies, ingredients and of course exhaustive trial and error as a home brewer.
Any why the name ‘Quijota’?
‘Given our geographical location in Castilla la Manchan we looked for a name that would immediately identify us with the region so we came up with Quijota, a tribute to the most illustrious figure in of our history ‘Don Quijote’ (Quixote) , using its name in feminine because beer is feminine.

Juan continued ‘The main idea was to have 3 standard elaborations of well-differentiated styles, soft one, stronger one and black one. Our Brewer Master, great connoisseur and lover of German beers, provided us with these recipes:
QUIJOTA RUBIA (KÖLSCH style) 4.8% vol. Alk., EBC 12, IBUS 25
QUIJOTA MORENA (ALTBIER) 5.4% vol. Alc., EBC 41, IBUS 37 (1st ACCE Contest Award 2010)
QUIJOTA NEGRA (STOUT) 5.0% vol. Alc, EBC 84, IBUs 40 (2nd ACCE Contest Award 2012)
We also came up with an idea to prepare special elaborations, although they require more efforts in elaboration, design of labels etc., and these elaborations are very rewarding.’
On the other hand, elaboration of personalized recipes is an important part of the production process. Presently we are preparing 3 orders for customers who shall use our beer with their own mark and 2 more projects are in testing phase.
So, where can we find Quijota Beer?
‘At the beginning, the idea was to focus on local and provincial market. After few months, we faced an increasing necessity to expand, and we starting to look for new outlets at national level. Currently we almost 400 points of sale at National level, mainly achieved through the channels of HORECA and establishments of selected products. We have signed a contract with two major distributors to commercialize our beers nationwide. We also work with about 10 websites that sell craft beers online.
In May 2016 we obtained the international kosher certificate, without geographical limitation, being the first Spanish brewery (industrial or craft beer brewery) to obtain it. The kosher symbol on the label represents much more than a product, conforming to religious norms and standards. With a control and care that is involved, it guarantees the highest levels of quality for a great diversity of customers, and of course, it allows us to be included in the kosher gourmet section of El Corte Ingles super markets, at national level.
And the future for Quijota?
We are taking new contacts to start exporting, although it’s a slow process. Our aim is to start exporting to Eastern Europe and also Argentina and other South American countries.
Our biggest challenge is to keep making better beers, to grow and create jobs. The main idea or point of self-employment project is to be able to live thanks to this project and at the same time, have fun working on the beer elaborations.

And so, finally we get to taste the fruits of Juan’s labour. I chose QUIJOTA RUBIA (KÖLSCH style) 4.8 ABV. This light and refreshing Blonde style beer is a fusion of two cultures, mast Mancha and German noble hops. With a golden colour it pours with a medium lasting white head. It tastes with a slight bitterness, malty but with fruity flavour. Salud!
Find out more about Quijota at http://www.cervezasquijota.es


Related wikiHows


Adjuncts Abroad

Grain adjuncts have earned a place in the brewing practices of countries outside of the United States. British brewing corn has become a common ingredient in many English bitters, and wheat is widely used in small quantities to improve head retention. Elsewhere in Europe, grain adjuncts have a wide popularity in lager production. Most adjunct brewers use corn or rice, though some German brewers use &ldquochit malt,&rdquo a malt so under-modified that it closely resembles unmalted barley. Belgians, not surprisingly, have many adjunct beers, ranging from popular lagers and beers made with spelt and buckwheat to witbier and lambic, both brewed with unmalted wheat. Equally exotic adjunct brews are found in Africa, where Nigerian breweries have attempted to produce a range of beers, from lager to stout, entirely from sorghum.

The Indispensable Double Mash

A double mash is essential when brewing with cracked grains, grits, and starch. This process sounds complicated, but it is no more complex than a single-decoction mash. Like decoction mashing, though, this process requires an additional kettle for the cereal mash. (Dave Miller&rsquos Homebrewing Guide and Wahl-Henius are the best sources for more information on double mashing.)

In the first pot, mix the adjunct with about 30% of its weight in pale malt. Do not neglect the malt. The malt&rsquos enzymes help to liquefy the starch in the grits. Without the malt, the adjunct will burn on the bottom of the cereal cooker and you will spend hours cleaning it off.

Add hot water at the rate of 1 gallon/lb of adjunct and malt until the temperature stabilizes at 155 °F (68 °C). Hold this temperature for 15 or 20 minutes so the enzymes in the malt have time to convert the malt&rsquos starches to sugars and to begin liquefying the adjunct. After the 20-minute rest, begin slowly raising the mash temperature, stirring carefully to avoid caramelization. As with any kind of cooking, stirring is especially important when dealing with highly starchy mashes, which tend to burn to the bottom of the kettle. Bring the cereal mash to a boil and boil it for 40 (for starch) to 60 minutes (for grits or cracked grain). By this point the cereals will have swelled up and exploded, gelatinizing the starch and rendering it vulnerable to diastatic enzymes.

While the cereal mash is at 155 °F (68 °C), mash in the remainder of the pale malt and any specialty malts in a separate kettle. Use a very thick mash, with perhaps 1 qt of water/lb of malt. Stabilize this thick mash at 122 °F (50 °C) for a protein rest. (This is especially important if using protein-rich six-row malt.)

When the cereal mash finishes boiling, carefully stir it into the malt mash. Be very careful about spills, because the boiling-hot gelatinized cereal mush sticks to skin and burns it easily. I find that when I do this to a 25% adjunct batch using my own equipment, it raises the temperature of the entire mash to about 153 °F (67 °C), just where I usually want it for saccharification. Different breweries will require adjustments, of course.


Filling Bottles is vastly different from filling Kegs

Filling kegs is pretty straightforward. All you have to do is reach out to your preferred kegging equipment suppliers in India and get the required equipment and you’re good to go.

The kegging process is as follows: You draft your recipe, brew the beer, fill into kegs and sell it at your pub, in-house restaurant or sell it to other pubs. In this method, you make profits by selling your beer at retail counters, helping you grow your microbrewery.

What next?

If you decide that you want to bottle beer for distribution to various retail counters, then you need to start bottling the beer you produce. You have two options:

Option 1:

You can outsource your bottling to a contractor. Initially, the number of bottles is modest – around 500 to 1000 bottles at a time. In this case, it makes sense to outsource your bottling needs to a contractor instead of setting up a bottling plant in your premises.

In this case, you transport your kegs to the contractor. The contractor uses their machinery to fill up the beer from the kegs into bottles and transports the bottles back to your brewery. From the brewery, once the quality check is done, the bottles are distributed to various pubs, restaurants, and other retail counters.

Drawbacks of this method: While this method works initially, it’s more of a hassle, once the volume of your bottled beer increases. Additionally, you have to depend on the contractor to meet your supply demands.

This brings us to the next option.


SUFFOLK

Woodside Orchards Hard Cider has variations, such as sweet, apple lemon and cinnamon apple—they’ve also had apple ginger, apple raspberry and apple pumpkin in the past. (Credit: Woodside Orchards Hard Cider/Facebook)

Woodside Hard Cider
Woodside Orchards, Route 25, Aquebogue. 631-722-5770. woodsideorchards.com

Yes, this is a cidery, not a brewery, but until enough Long Island apple orchards start making so much hard cider that they need a separate guide, Woodside must be listed alongside beer brewers.

The North Fork Hard Cidery doesn’t just serve regular hard apple cider, although that is available, too. They also have variations, such as sweet, apple lemon and cinnamon apple—they’ve also had apple ginger, apple raspberry and apple pumpkin in the past. All that’s in addition to apple wine, apple pie and other apple goods they sell.

“The reception has exceeded our expectations,” Bob Gammon, who co-owns Woodside Orchards with his brother, Scott, told The New York Times. “All our ciders are based on the English-style ciders, so they are less sweet.”

Several local wineries have dabbled with cider, although thus far those productions appear to be one-offs. other apple orchards on LI sell non-alcoholic sweet cider, but so far this is the only one that regularly ferments hard cider and offers it at a tasting room.

Flagship Cider: Traditional

The Brewers Collective
1460 N. Clinton Ave., Unit C, Bay Shore. thebrewerscollective.com

Here comes the revolution within the revolution. Operated by six owners who all have an equal share in the business, The Brewers Collective grew out of a home brewers club that came together in 2007. By 2013, however, the club decided it was time let the rest of Long Island in on their little secret, and thus The Brewers Collective was born.

They got their start at the microbrewery incubator in Farmingdale known as A Taste of Long Island, but left for their own space in Bay Shore, which is currently under construction and expected to have its grand opening, tasting room and all, in the fall.

The Collective is a certified New York State farm brewery, using hops grown on the East End and upstate, and they’re in the process of capturing wild yeast in Bay Shore. The Collective is also big on Gruit Ale, which one of its founder, Sarah Dougherty, calls “very ancient.” While rare now, Gruit Ale, which is a mix of different herbs, was once wildly popular.

The Collective had been distributing to about a half-dozen restaurants in Suffolk County when it was operating in Farmingdale. Once it reopens, it plans to brew up to five of its beers year-round and a rotation of seasonal brews. Among its unique beers is a Gruit made with sage, lemon balm and hibiscus.

Flagship Beer: Useful Idiot IPA

Great South Bay Brewery’s Blonde Ambition Summer Ale. (Credit: Great South Bay/Facebook)

Great South Bay Brewery
25 Drexel Dr., Bay Shore. 631-392-8472. Greatsouthbaybrewery.com

Fans of Long Island craft beer can’t get enough of Great South Bay Brewery.

With popular brews like Blood Orange and Snaggletooth, a glorious stout, this South Shore brewery has been making waves for some time. Its brewery, located in an industrial area in Bay Shore, attracts droves of beer enthusiasts on weekends. Pay a visit, and you’re likely to find patrons sipping beers amid games of corn hole and foosball.

But mostly people come out for the beer.

The brewery typically has about a dozen beers on tap on any given day, and boasts a wide range of styles: from cream ales and pale ales to stouts and seasonal delights. And with beer names like Sleigh Rye Winter Ale, Candleabrum, Hopsy Dazy and Devil’s Deed, you have to admire their imagination. Great South Bay Brewery is a New York State-certified farm brewery.

Flagship Beer: Blood Orange Pale Ale

Destination Unknown Beer Co.
1 South Chicago Ave., Bay Shore. 631-485-2232. destinationunknownbeercompany.com

Destination Unknown Beer Co., or DubCo for short, may not know where they’re going, but the sky’s the limit for this up-and-coming microbrewery that opened during Long Island Craft Beer Week 2015.

The duo behind this two-man operation is Brad Finn, a high school teacher, and his lifelong friend and co-founder, Chris Candiano, a contractor. They haven’t quit their day jobs, but this certified farm brewery still manages to turn out a new brew once weekly. Their beer can be found on tap at local bars and restaurants, as well as in their tasting room.

“We’re small enough that we can still experiment and take chances,” Candiano told News12 Long Island.

Their brews include Barrel Aged Sonar, Beach Chair Blonde, For Shore Hefeweizen, Mellow Mood IPA, and Sore Thumb IPA.

Flagship Beer: Dominick White IPA

Twin Fork Beer Co.
Calverton. 631-209-4233. twinforkbeer.com

As anyone familiar with Long Island may have realized after reading the name of this microbrewery, Twin Fork Beer Co. is located on the East End, near the North and South forks.

But their name references more than just their location. It’s also a wink to the owners, Dan and Peter Chekijian, identical twins who founded the brewery in 2014. Their tap handles, found at restaurants across LI and NYC, is a musical tuning fork—a tip of the hat to their father, a classical pianist.

“Music was always a large presence in the family, instilling not only a love of music but also discipline and good work ethic,” the brewers said on their website.

It also clearly provided them with the creativity required to go into the microbrewery business. Although they self-distribute their beer, Twin Forks Beer Co. is still in the process of establishing their tasting room. Check their website for updates on its status.

Flagship Beer: Chromatic Ale

Barrage Brewing Company’s take on the popular “Black and Tan” beer, featuring YadaYadaYada and The Clancy. (Barrage Brewing Co./Facebook)

Barrage Brewing Company
32 Allen Blvd., East Farmingdale. 516-986-8066. barragebrewing.com

Founded by a former Long Island Rail Road employee who transformed his garage into a bar—thus the name, “Barrage”—this craft brewery offers nearly two dozen brews with eclectic names like “Famous Last Words,” “One Ryed Monkey” and “Yada Yada Yada.”

The brewery itself is about two years old, but prior to turning his love affair with beer into a full-fledged operation, founder Steve Pominski had been homebrewing for more than 20 years—well before the Long Island craft beer revolution took hold.

Pominski attended the Siebel Institute of Technology and World Brewing Academy in Chicago so he could master his craft, and now he’s taking what he learned at home and from the pros to serve up a wide variety of IPAs, ales, stouts, porters, and more to Long Island’s burgeoning craft beer fan base.

Initially only open to the public for growler fills, Barrage now boasts a tasting room so thirsty artisan beer drinkers can sample beers while taking in the ambiance.

Flagship Beer: Yada Yada Yada

Tweaking Frog Brewing Company boasts such brews as Ribbit Red Ale, their take on an American Red Ale, Raging Pollywog IPA and Twerking Blond Ale. (Credit: Tweaking Frog Brewing Co./Facebook)

Tweaking Frog Brewing Co.
211-A Main St., Farmingdale. 631-897-5509. tweakingfrogbrewing.com

This funky upstart New York State-certified farm brewery got its start at a craft beer incubator known as “A Taste of Long Island,” which was later sold to Lithology Brewing Co.

Lithology, which was also born out of ATOLI, made the space their headquarters and tasting room, but let Tweaking Frog share it, although other brewers that started there have since moved on. In that shared, magical, craft-beer cradle, Tweaking Frog launched its operation and tasting room in 2016.

“I have been an avid home brewer for the better part of eight years, with dreams of starting up a microbrewery of my own,” owner Joseph Curley said in a GoFundMe request for donations to help launch Tweaking Frog. “After a year of focused planning, research, and a lot of luck, I was able to secure a location.”

Tweaking Frog brews, which have started to appear on taps at restaurants on Long Island, include Ribbit Red Ale, their take on an American Red Ale, Raging Pollywog IPA, and (the Miley Cyrus-inspired?) Twerking Blond Ale.

Flagship Beer: Ribbit Red Ale

Fire Island Beer Co.
Fire Island. 631-482-3118. fireislandbeer.com

This microbrewery’s beers stimulate the senses, just like the barrier island where it was conceived and for which it was named, but fans shouldn’t expect to find a brewery on Fire Island.

The trio behind these beers was looking for a brick-and-mortar location to set up shop since they founded the company in 2009, but that hasn’t stopped them from brewing up new concoctions while farming the operation out to other brewers. Former investment banker Simon Leonard became a majority owner of the company in 2014, with the founders remaining on as minority owners. While a permanent home has been uncertain, one thing is clear—the beer they brew is a hit.

“The original founders will still have a stake in the company and will be instrumental in helping move [it] forward,” the company said on its blog. “This will include a physical location in Long Island and potentially a sister site in Connecticut.”

Bert Fernandez co-founded the company with his brother, Tom, and cousin, Jeff Glassman, after they devised their first beer at their family’s home in Atlantique, a small, secluded residential community on FI next to a park of the same name, with just one restaurant, The Session Stand, which was the first bar to serve their beer. [RELATED STORY: A Beginner’s Guide To Summer On Fire Island]

Flaghip Beer: Lighthouse Ale

Greenport Harbor Brewing Company’s two owners became buddies in college and bonded over less-than-stellar beer. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)

Greenport Harbor Brewing Co.
234 Carpenter St., Greenport. 631-477-1100. greenportharborbrewing.com

This dynamic brewery on the eastern tip of Long Island has risen to such heights that its beer is already being featured in bottles and on tap in New York City, upstate New York, and across the Long Island Sound in Connecticut.

It’s been quite a run for its two founders, whom became buddies in college and bonded over less-than-stellar beer. Now they play host to daycationers and locals alike who visit Greenport for its waterfront access, history, and incomparable seafood spots. But the brewery itself—located in a converted firehouse—has become an attraction of its own. Make no mistake, however, it’s the beer that makes people coming back for more.

The brewery has been such a success that the duo steering the ship have opened a second location in Peconic—which features a tasting room just like its hometown brewery, as well as bottling equipment.

Greenport specializes in a variety of ales, seasonal favorites—fall is not complete without Leaf Pile, FYI—along with porters and Indian pale ales. Greenport Harbor Brewing Co. is a New York State-certified farm brewery.

1940’s Brewing Co.
1337 Lincoln Ave., #1, Holbrook. 1940sbrewingcompany.com

Beer is in Charlie Becker’s blood. The third-generation brewer decided to go pro and is now walking the same path his grandfather and father followed years ago.

With both family patriarchs in the beer business, it seems Becker found the perfect fit. The only question may be: What took so darn long?

1940’s Brewing Co., founded in 2014, is currently producing about a half-dozen year-round beers, including staples such as Golden Riveter IPA, and I Slip U Fall (double IPA). But there’s more to 1940’s Brewing than IPAs. It also produces a seasonal saison, a German rye, an oatmeal stout, and a German wheat beer. For soccer fans, 1940’s is also known for a English IPA named after the beloved Premier League club Arsenal.

The brewery decided to pay homage to Becker’s family’s beer past by naming the company after the year in which his father graduated from the U.S. Brewer’s Academy. Its tasting room officially opened in August.

Saint James Brewery
929 Lincoln Ave., Holbrook. saintjamesbrewery.com

Don’t let the name confuse you. This Belgian-inspired local craft brewery is in Holbrook, not Saint James. The moniker is a nod to their European-style brews, not the address of the brewery.

Saint James Brewery’s dedication to traditional techniques is matched only by this certified farm brewery’s commitment to only using the freshest local ingredients. That includes hops from Wading River, honey from Mattituck, apples from Northport, their own special strain of yeast, filtered local water and barley grown upstate.

“We believe in the farm-to-pint, the farm-to-table mentality,” Jamie Adams, who co-founded the brewery with his wife, Rachel, in 2012, told Beer Sessions Radio. “We shop at farmers markets ourselves…it was a natural progression for us.”

They even compost their spent barley and hops, then use that compost in their garden, where they grow some of their ingredients.

Since setting up shop, Saint James’ brews can be found on taps at dozens of bars and restaurants across Long Island and New York City.

Spider Bite Beer Co.
920 Lincoln Ave., Unit 5, Holbrook. 631-942-3255. spiderbitebeer.com

These brewers share their careers’ inspiration with Spiderman, but instead of a spider bite giving them the power to climb walls, sling webs and fight crime, their superpower is brewing terrific beer.

Founded in 2008, Spider Bite was among the first to set up shop amid the current LI craft beer boom. It was established by Larry Goldstein, a chiropractor, and his mortician neighbor, Anthony LiCausi. They won Best Craft Brewery in New York State in 2012.

“We can’t even keep up with demand,” Goldstein previously told the Press. [RELATED STORY: Long Island’s Craft Beer Explosion] “We’re always playing catch-up.”

Many of their beers have arachnid-themed names, such as Eye Be Use Imperial IPA, Eight Legged RyPA, White Bite Wheat Ale and Boris the Spider Russian Imperial Stout, their winter release (lil nod there to The Who song? this one goes up to Entwistle).

Flagship Beer: First Bite Pale Ale

Squarehead Brewing Co.
405 High St., Holbrook. 631-921-3060. squareheadbrewing.com

Squarehead Brewing Co. takes farm-to-pint so seriously that they grow their own hops in the field next to their Holbrook craft brewery and tasting room, scheduled to open in 2016.

Dave and Brad Jordan, a father-and-son team of homebrewers-turned-microbrewers, gave a nod to their ancestors when naming their certified farm brewery. A squarehead is defined as a person of German, Dutch, Scandinavian or Swedish origin.

“The elderberry clone was one of the first beers,” Dave told Drunk and Unemployed. “We saw the public response, that was like, yup, all in.”

Although they’re just getting underway, since they prefer small batches, they already list about 30 ales, porters, stouts, IPAs and other brews on their website. They include Hippies on The Yip, a Belgian blossom saison 3 Dollar Bill, a pistachio pale ale Suite Solitude, a strawberries-and-cream ale as well as winter ales, an Oktoberfest brew and three different coffee imperial stouts.

Montauk Brewing Co.
62 S. Erie Ave., Montauk. 631-668-8471. montaukbrewingco.com

The do-it-yourself attitude that the easternmost community on Long Island is known for flows from the owners of the Montauk Brewing Co. like brew from the taps in their rustic tasting room.

Vaughan Cutillo and two of his fellow ex-lifeguard buddies, Joseph Sullivan and Eric Moss, founded the brewery and “gallery tap room”—adorned with Hamptons artists’ abstract paintings and scenic photos—in an old wood-working company showroom in 2012. Their logo adorns a trailer-hitched beach cruiser bicycle, which the trio uses to tow 170-lb. beer kegs to local pubs.

“It’s our Clydesdales,” jokes Cutillo, referring to the team of horses Budweiser uses in their promotions. While pouring 4-oz. samples of his hometown’s namesake beer, he added: “We got pretty lucky to be able to do this here.”

Located just outside of the traffic circle in downtown Montauk, these entrepreneurs arguably run one of the most scenic local craft breweries on LI, with an outdoor seating area that offers views of Fort Pond.

Flagship Brew: Driftwood Ale

Bellport Brewing Company
Moriches. bellportbrewing.com

Founded in 2013, Bellport Brewing Co. prides itself on a true “farm-to-pint” experience. The certified farm brewery sits atop a 13-acre hop farm, and uses 20-percent New York-sourced ingredients in its brews with a goal of 90 percent by 2024.

Its head brewer and founder, Brian Baker, got his start as a homebrewer, and developed his skills over time. It also helped that he mingled with craft beer fanatics who make up the Long Island Malt and Beer Enthusiasts group. The home brewing experience, combined with the knowledge of other beer aficionados, helped guide Baker and his two partners to where they are now.

Since the brewery is conveniently located on a farm where hops are grown, it comes as no surprise that the bulk of its beers are Indian Pale Ales. Out of the four beers it currently produces, three are IPAs: South Country IPA, Bitter Thaw, and Very Bitter Thaw. Bellport pays homage to the South Shore village it’s named after by dubbing its only non-IPA brew “Captain Tom’s Porter”—in reference to one of the village’s two founders.

The brewery’s tasting room is tentatively scheduled to open in September.

Flagship Beer: South Country IPA

Sand City Brewing Company was founded in 2015. Less than a year later it’s beer was flowing in local restaurants. (Credit: Sand City Brewing Co./Facebook

Sand City Brewing Co.
60 Main St., Northport. sandcitybeer.com

From the tasting room bar built from reclaimed barn wood to their name, which is a throwback to when Northport village was a sand mining town, this brewery is steeped in history.

Established in a former vintage clothing shop in one of Long Island’s quintessential waterfront downtowns two blocks from Northport Harbor, Sand City Brewing Co. has a lot more going for it than just a great location—they also make delicious beer.

“I’ve always been a hop head,” Kevin Sihler, Sand City’s head brewer, told The Happy Hour Guys, who dubbed him the “hops whisperer.” Sihler explained their mentality like this: “Let’s brew what we like to brew. People will either drink it or they won’t, and hopefully we can educate those people to try new things.”

Sandy City was founded in 2015 by Sihler, Bill Kiernan, and Frank McNally. Less than a year after opening, they were already on taps at restaurants across Long Island.

Although they don’t serve food themselves, a waiter from Tim’s Shipwreck Diner next door comes in to take orders and serve food to patrons at Sand City. Former Northport hellraiser (and King of the Beats) Jack Kerouac would surely have split his time between Sandy City and his infamous haunt Gunther’s, had the brewery been around back in the day. [RELATED STORY: Jack Kerouac” The Long Island Years]

Flagship Beer(s): Oops I Hopped My Pants, Day Drifter

Blue Point Brewing Co.
161 River Ave., Patchogue. 844-272-2739. bluepointbrewing.com

The largest and one of the oldest craft breweries on Long Island is increasingly found on taps nationwide since InBev, the world’s largest brewing company, bought Blue Point Brewing Co. in 2014.

Despite that reported $24 million sale, the brewery’s original partners continue to run the show—the deal really just helped their liquidity and allowed them to tap larger markets. They’re expanding their Patchogue River-front brewery and tasting room, but they still have the same attitude that’s as bold and refreshing as their brews.

“One of the things we say about brewing is it’s 99-percent asshole-free, and I don’t wanna be that one percent,” Mark Burford, who co-founded Blue Point in 1997, previously told the Press.

Of course, Blue Point’s success flows not just from being nice, but also from consistently brewing up great new beers.

The brewery, named for the hamlet just south of Patchogue village where they’re headquartered, wisely co-opted the moniker of another nationally successful LI export, Blue Point Oysters, which go great with a pint.

Flagship Beer: Toasted Lager

Brickhouse Brewery & Restaurant
67 W. Main St., Patchogue. 631-447-2337. brickhousebrewery.com

Brickhouse Brewery has become a staple for Long Island beer drinkers. For more than 20 years, Brickhouse has been serving up pub favorites alongside beers brewed in-house.

The brewery itself is located in Patchogue’s oldest commercial building, which the brew pub estimates was built around 1850. The beer industry has changed quite a bit since Brickhouse purchased the building in 1995. There wasn’t the glut of small breweries there are now, but Brickhouse still finds a way to stand out.

It’s taproom flows with everything from IPAs and cream ales (one of which is soaked in whiskey!) to saisons, and more. The brewery has its own brewmaster, assistant brewer, and employs a craft beer consultant.

And while it’s always producing different varieties, the brew pub does have about four that it considers flagship beers: Street Light, Beowulf IPA, Brickhouse Red and Nitro Boom Stout.

The nautical-themed brewery is a must-see spot on any beer tour. (Port Jefferson Brewing Co./Facebook)

Port Jefferson Brewing Co.
22 Mill Creek Rd., Port Jefferson. 1-877-475-2739. portjeffbrewing.com

As is this case with so many craft brewing operations, Port Jefferson Brewing began with a home-brewing kit. Sadly, the first beer owner Mike Philbrick produced from the kit was less than stellar. Good thing for us he’s a quick learner.

The former home-improvement company salesman is now churning out some of the best brews on the Island, and his artisan delights can be found at restaurants and bars across Nassau and Suffolk counties. The nautical-themed brewery, home to a cozy tasting room that fills up with people enjoying Port Jeff’s lively downtown, is a must-see spot on any beer tour. Thirsty visitors can stop in for a pint, tasting or growler fill.

Port Jeff mainstays include Schooner Ale, Port Jeff Porter and the H3. Anyone planning to make a trip to the waterfront village should pop in for a pint or two.

Flagship Beer: Schooner Ale

Moustache Brewing Co.
400 Hallett Ave., Riverhead. 631-591-3250. moustachebrewing.com

Lauri and her moustached husband, Matthew, had been homebrewing for years—sound familiar?—before they decided to pursue their dream job. For Lauri, it took a life coach to inquire about what her dream job would be for her to realize she wanted to brew beer for a living. [RELATED STORY: ‘Hop-Crazy’ & Growing: Long Island Craft Beer Boom Pours On]

Now here they are, brewing a variety of hand-crafted drinks in Riverhead, the undisputed capital of Long Island’s ever-growing beer industry. Beer lovers had been salivating over Moustache’s product even before the brewery opened in 2014. Moustache would sell their brews at the local farmers’ market as they continued to perfect their recipe. It wouldn’t take long for kegs to run dry.

Their trademark beer, Everyman’s Porter, is a remarkably light-bodied porter with hints of roasted coffee. Moustache also produces a delicious Milk + Honey Brown Ale, several other core beers, and seasonal beers, including a double IPA—the first in their “atomic” series. Moustache Brewing Co. is a New York State-certified farm brewery.

Flagship Beer: Everyman’s Porter

Crooked Ladder Brewing Co.
70 W. Main St., Riverhead. 631-591-3565. crookedladderbrewing.com

If any town on Long Island should be considered the undisputed capital of craft beer, it’s Riverhead.

Tucked in the center of Riverhead’s idyllic Main Street, Crooked Ladder has established itself as not only a craft brewery, but a destination for anyone looking to put back a few cold ones with friends and family while enjoying a night out on the town.

Crooked Ladder has developed more than three-dozen beers since it opened in 2013. Its tasting room typically has eight beers on tap, with the list of offerings varying, depending on the season. For instance, anyone walking into the brewery in the summer may come upon “Summeritis,” a gold-colored summer ale.

If there’s a style of beer that appeals to you the most, it’s a good bet that Crooked Ladder’s brewmasters have put their talents to the test. Its full list of microbrews includes everything from ubiquitous IPAs and ales (red and brown) to saisons, strong ales, stouts, pilsners, and porters. And if you’re looking for a more robust get-together with friends, the brewery also rents out the space for events.

Long Ireland Beer Co.
817 Pulaski St., Riverhead. 631-403-4303. longirelandbrewing.com

Long Ireland Beer Co., located in an East End neighborhood known as Polish Town, sounds like an international brewing operation, but the owners are as fiercely local as can be.

Greg Martin, who founded the craft brewery and tasting room with his business partner, Ed Burke, in 2011, once saw his salesman kicked out of a bar for asking the bar owner to not have Long Ireland replace a tap occupied by a Blue Point Brewery beer.

“He had said, ‘Well, is there maybe a different beer you’d consider taking off? We know those guys, they’re local guys, we’re friends,’” Martin previously told the Press. He recalled that the owner yelled back: “If you’re not willing to take Blue Point’s lines and be competitive, then you’re not gonna make it in this business!”

Long Ireland, a New York State-certified farm brewery, later recovered the sale when the bar’s patrons kept asking for it. And years later, they’re not only making it in the beer biz, their distribution reach is growing, all the time.

They’re frequently asked, ‘What’s up with that name?’ It came to Martin in the shower while nursing a bad hangover the day after St. Patrick’s Day. True story.

Rocky Point Artisan Brewers
rockypointartisanbeer.com

This nanobrewery may operate out of a garage since it was licensed in 2012, but the trio running Rocky Point Artisan Brewers has big ideas about the future of LI’s beer scene.

Donavan Hall, a physicist who co-founded RPAB with his friend, Mike Voigt, and their “mad scientist,” Yuri Janssen, another physicist, envisions a brewery in every LI town, like in parts of Europe. They aim to become a Community Supported Brewery—like Community Supported Agriculture, in which people pre-purchase the harvest of small local farmers.

“We would like to turn Long Island into a very diverse beer culture,” Donavan Hall previously told the Press. “We want people to have a beer in Rocky Point that they’re really not going to get anywhere else.”

They’re too small to have a tasting room, but RPAB’s beers can be found at about two dozen bars, restaurants and beer distributors across LI and New York City.

Their vision of a European-style brewtopia on LI isn’t just the beer talking. The trio helped found the Long Island Beer & Malt Enthusiasts, billed as the largest local homebrew club that is like LI’s craft brewery farm team.

Since they’re all about the small batches, they don’t have a flagship beer, but their most popular year-round offerings include Red Saison, Pilsner and Hefe.

Shelter Island Craft Brewery
55 North Ferry Rd., Shelter Island. 631-749-5977. home.shelterislandcraftbrewery.com

Even the smallest town on Long Island was not immune from the local microbrew boom, with Shelter Island Craft Brewery serving especially flavorful brews in its namesake downtown as of 2015.

Among the local ingredients this New York State-certified farm brewery reportedly uses are honey, apples, beach plums and scallops from Shelter Island, plus spices grown in the brewmaster’s garden. The founder, Jim Hull, a former jeweler, derives his recipes from time spent in the kitchen.

“I just like to cook, it’s my passion,” Hull told Long Island Wine Press. “It is like being a chef, but harder.”

Founded in an old insurance office, visitors to the brewery can soak up the aromas inside, or take their beers outside to sit at one of the picnic tables under umbrellas.

Blind Bat Brewery
Smithtown. blindbatbrewery.com

Blind Bat may still be on the hunt for a home to nest in, but that hasn’t stopped the prolific beer producers from giving Long Islanders what they want. It’s a go-to on locals’ quality-beer radar, that’s for sure.

Whether it’s at a local farmers’ market, beer distributor, or craft beer bar, Blind Bat fans go to great lengths to get their hands on the brewery’s latest concoction. So far, Blind Bat, which incorporates farm-fresh ingredients into some of its creations, has brewed 30 different beers.

Since its founder Paul Dlugokencky is brewing out of a detached garage outside his Centerport home, all of their creations are not available at once, but fans will be sure to find something delightful no matter what they’re craving. Not only can he brew, but the Blind Bat himself is proficient at coming up with wildly imaginative names for his hand-crafted refreshments.

Our favorite is “Four Eyes Quadruple Ale”—inspired, no doubt, by founder Paul Dlugokencky’s poor vision. As Dlugokencky has proved, you don’t need 20/20 eyesight to have the vision to turn a hobby and passion into an independent business you can be proud of.

Flagship Beer: Hellsmoke Porter

Southampton Publick House
62 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 631-283-2800. www.publick.com

Long Island’s oldest brew-making establishment is more than just a brewery. Southampton Publick House is also home to a restaurant, where patrons can wash down pub food with its award-winning beers, and a hoppening taproom replete with seasonal beers and year-round offerings.

Southampton Publick House is unique in that it’s the only brewpub on Long Island that distributes its delicious creations to stores in the region. Its artisan adult beverages can also be found in beer distributors located throughout the eastern seaboard, plus Puerto Rico.

Publick House is no stranger to accolades. Beer Advocate Magazine named it Brew Pub of the Year in 2003, and its beers have gone on to win several awards throughout the years.

On a typical visit, beer lovers can knock back the popular Burton India Pale Ale, styled after brews made famous in the English town of Burton-on-Trent, the Southampton Double White, similar to ubiquitous Belgian witbiers, and Keller Pils, an old-fashioned lager.